HistorianRuby: A Blogging Break

You may have noticed that I have been missing in action as of late! After my mammoth Blogmas schedule over Christmas, I didn’t feel like I needed a break, I even went history-hunting in central London and Windsor between Christmas and New Year. However, as I started January with three new posts and one re-jig of a post from last year, the gap between posts … Continue reading HistorianRuby: A Blogging Break

Fashion Museum: A History of Fashion in 100 Objects – Part Four

I visited Bath Fashion Museum recently, specifically to see their special exhibition at the Fashion Museum, Royal Women: Public Life, Personal Style that you can read about here. They have many ‘treasures’ in their collection and I have posted a short series sharing with my readership the fashions of previous centuries. In ‘Part One’ I focused on items that the museum displayed from before the nineteenth century, in … Continue reading Fashion Museum: A History of Fashion in 100 Objects – Part Four

In the News: Edvard Munch Exhibition at the British Museum

There’s an exciting exhibition of Edvard Munch’s work coming to the British Museum this spring and summer! Who hasn’t seen an image of Munch’s The Scream? One of the items on display will be a rare black and white lithograph of the iconic image The Scream and its resonance is clear today as it was when it was first painted. Munch was fascinated by peoples’ … Continue reading In the News: Edvard Munch Exhibition at the British Museum

A Royal Wedding: The Duke and Duchess of Sussex Exhibition​ at Windsor Castle

So what do you do in the hinterland that is the time between Christmas and New Year? You go to a free exhibition, of course! Okay, so it wasn’t completely free, I took a train from Kingston upon Thames to Windsor but it was still cheaper than my ticket into London the day before. I paid to get into Windsor Castle the week of the … Continue reading A Royal Wedding: The Duke and Duchess of Sussex Exhibition​ at Windsor Castle

The Glen Cinema Disaster: 71 Children Dead on Hogmanay 1929, Scotland’s Forgotten Tragedy

On 31 December 1929, Hogmanay, seventy-one children died and more than fifty were injured when young cinema-goers panicked after thick smoke billowed around the darkened auditorium during a children’s matinee performance of The Dude Desperado at the Glen Cinema, Paisley, Scotland. Calls of ‘fire’ prompted terrified children to flee towards the exits. Survivor Sadie Elias said she had chosen the Glen Cinema as it had … Continue reading The Glen Cinema Disaster: 71 Children Dead on Hogmanay 1929, Scotland’s Forgotten Tragedy

Diana: Her Fashion Story Revisited

Yesterday I had the pleasure of returning to Kensington Palace, London, to see the exhibition of the late Diana, Princess of Wales’ dresses, Diana: Her Fashion Story. You may have read my previous post, Diana: Her Fashion Story – The Kensington Palace Exhibition as I originally visited the exhibition in November 2017. This special exhibition is closing in February and so I was keen to … Continue reading Diana: Her Fashion Story Revisited

Blogmas: 21 Days of Christmas History Posts

The Articles Christmas Cards: Circa 1900 Queen Elizabeth II’s First Christmas Speech Christmas Nostalgia: all I want for Christmas is my Two Front Teeth Christmas Cards: 1905 – 1910 Hampton Court Palace: Baubles, Gifts and Posh Nosh this Christmas 6 December: the Feast Day of Saint Nicholas A Forces Christmas Card: 1917 King George V: the First Christmas Speech Postcards: Jenny Nyström’s Christmas Art The … Continue reading Blogmas: 21 Days of Christmas History Posts

25 December 1840, The London Evening Standard: A Report

Regular readers of my blog know that I often draw inspiration from the British Newspaper Archives. This does involve a small subscription, however, you can search and view a permitted three articles for free here. As it is the season of goodwill, I decided to share with you part of a report published on Christmas Day 1840 showing the festive food the poor of London were … Continue reading 25 December 1840, The London Evening Standard: A Report

Christmas Cards: the Royal Selection

What are your family Christmas traditions? The British royals, like all families, have their own. They exchange inexpensive presents on Christmas Eve and go to church on Christmas Day morning. They then sit down to a traditional Christmas turkey dinner before watching the Queen’s speech at 3 p.m. One of the big royal family traditions that everyone looks forward to, is the release of their personal Christmas … Continue reading Christmas Cards: the Royal Selection

The Royals: Christmases Past

With only three more sleeps until Christmas Day here are some pictures of Britain’s royal family’s Christmases past. I’m loving the vintage vibe of this shot. The Queen is more in focus than Prince Philip (order of precedence anyone?) and as usual, the Queen’s hair is perfectly coiffed and she is wearing a set of her beloved pearls in her ears and around her neck. The … Continue reading The Royals: Christmases Past

@HistorianRuby: Social Media Links UPDATED and with a NEW FaceBook Page

We all know that social media is increasingly important in many peoples lives. We check our stats, notifications, likes, follows and friend requests etc. and it’s no different for amateur and professional bloggers: we use social media to publicise our work. For public historians, it is crucial that they promote their latest TV programs, books and magazine articles using modern social media platforms to engage … Continue reading @HistorianRuby: Social Media Links UPDATED and with a NEW FaceBook Page

Christmas Day Tudor Style

Attendance at mass was a must whether you were rich or poor, religion was a serious business and observance of the holy days and a reverence of the holy family would ensure you a comfortable afterlife. Once their duties to God were performed the Tudor citizen could then enjoy the day as their status befitted. If you lived in the country (as did most) you would probably … Continue reading Christmas Day Tudor Style

The Victorian Christmas

Christmas was barely celebrated in the early part of the nineteenth century. It was not considered a public holiday and traditionally the giving of gifts was practised at New Year. However, come the end of the century, it was the biggest annual celebration in the British calendar. Workers had gained a two-day break (including the 26 December, Boxing Day) and the advent of the railways … Continue reading The Victorian Christmas

George I’s Christmas Pudding?

I’ve been tempted to research recipes from Christmases past for a #Blogmas post or two but my big fail is that I’m not an enthusiastic cook and maybe I would feel forced to enter the kitchen! Nevermind, with the help of BBC History Magazine (of which I’m a subscriber), I can share this recipe. My family aren’t big on Christmas pudding so it is generally … Continue reading George I’s Christmas Pudding?