London’s Millicent Fawcett Statue: the First Female Representation in Parliament Square

One hundred years ago Britain passed the Representation of the People Act which gave certain women over the age of thirty the right to vote. Women, and some men, had fought for years for suffrage equality but it took until towards the end of World War One before this was achieved. This week a statue was unveiled of the suffragist campaigner Millicent Garrett Fawcett in Parliament … Continue reading London’s Millicent Fawcett Statue: the First Female Representation in Parliament Square

Your Thoughts Required: ‘Guest Posts’ on Blogs

Over the last couple of weeks I’ve wondered how I can keep up with the pace of writing articles for 2 – 3 posts a week. Including this post I have published 16 articles in April and I’ve two scheduled for May. I’ve increased my output a lot since I started blogging again back in October. I’ve really enjoyed increasing my frequency of posting and I’ve … Continue reading Your Thoughts Required: ‘Guest Posts’ on Blogs

Pictures of History: Alnwick Castle

Welcome to my new series! Over the years I’ve visited many historical sites and snapped lots of photos alongside other visitors, but I’ve been loath to share my experiences since time has passed and exhibits may have changed. However, feedback from other bloggers said I was wrong, therefore I thought my readers would enjoy seeing some of my favourite pictures from my exploits around the … Continue reading Pictures of History: Alnwick Castle

A Blogging Experiment and a Domain Name

In the last six months my blog has grown gaining many new readers and (I assume) some of my original 40-odd followers are no longer blogging. Indeed, initially enthusiastic, after three months I failed to blog for fourteen whole months! But I had a couple of early posts that proved popular with internet searches and thus my blog was not exactly dormant (even though I … Continue reading A Blogging Experiment and a Domain Name

More from the Philanthropic Society

In my recent post the Philanthropic Society I introduced you to ten-year-old George Lefoy the first ‘subject’, as the children of the Philanthropic Society were called. In this article I give you Thomas Mitchell and Nicholas Sweetman, subjects number two and three. Children admitted into the Society’s Reform were the offspring of the criminal classes or those destitute and in need of rescuing from penury … Continue reading More from the Philanthropic Society

The Philanthropic Society

My Master’s dissertation was a study of the Philanthropic Society founded in the late eighteenth century. Having changed computers since my original research, with the majority of it lost, I was thrilled to come across this photograph in my ‘old’ emails. The Philanthropic Society was founded in London in 1788 and its mission was to resolve the problem of homeless and criminal children.  It was … Continue reading The Philanthropic Society

History of Early Actresses

Professional theatre had to be recreated after the Restoration of the monarchy in 1660, for during the Interregnum period most forms of theatre had ceased, Oliver Cromwell and his Puritan government had closed theatres in 1642. The first actress appeared on the London stage in 1660.  Subsequently, Charles II issued a royal warrant in 1662 stating that henceforth ‘women rather than boy actors were to play … Continue reading History of Early Actresses

Why was the Perception of the Actress and the Prostitute Interchangeable in the Eighteenth Century? 

Introduction During the eighteenth century, the social standing of the actress and the prostitute was targeted by moral reformers and satirical authors.  The moral reformer targeted actresses for criticism ‘as their actions and speech on stage were considered immodest.’  The satirical author was interested in publishing any related scandal that surrounded the actress.  Historians have argued that ‘either sort of author could criticise an actress … Continue reading Why was the Perception of the Actress and the Prostitute Interchangeable in the Eighteenth Century? 

Sourcing History for Blogging: Research Without Leaving the House

What inspires me to write an article for my history blog? The answer could be anything. A phrase,  a book, watching a film, a TV programme, a memory or possibly a newspaper article. I work away from home a lot and so need resources that can inform when at home or staying in a hotel. Here I take a look at some of my blog … Continue reading Sourcing History for Blogging: Research Without Leaving the House

Mayflower Passenger Pilgrim Father William Mullins Lived Here

On a trip to Dorking, Surrey, I came across this plaque commemorating the home of Pilgrim Father William Mullins. He lived at 58 West Street and it is the only surviving home of a Pilgrim Father. The building dates from the late sixteenth century. Mullins bought it with a mortgage in 1612 and sold it in 1619. He ran a successful shoe shop and was … Continue reading Mayflower Passenger Pilgrim Father William Mullins Lived Here

Fashion Museum: A History of Fashion in 100 Objects – Part Four

I visited Bath Fashion Museum recently, specifically to see their special exhibition at the Fashion Museum, Royal Women: Public Life, Personal Style that you can read about here. They have many ‘treasures’ in their collection and I have posted a short series sharing with my readership the fashions of previous centuries. In ‘Part One’ I focused on items that the museum displayed from before the nineteenth century, in … Continue reading Fashion Museum: A History of Fashion in 100 Objects – Part Four

Using Postcards for Family History

In my article The Many Ways to Consume History, I gave examples of ways that I consume history, most examples were of public history and from a non-academic source. One of the ways I stated I consume history is by collecting antique postcards. This Easter Monday I visited a Postcard and Collectable Paper Fair that is scheduled for my local recreation centre once or twice a … Continue reading Using Postcards for Family History