Using Postcards for History: Suffragettes

In my post Suffragettes – Pictures say a Thousand Words, I touched on the subject of Edwardian propaganda. The battle (as at times it was a battle) for women to achieve the vote, is remembered this centenary year of the Representation of the People Act which permitted some women who met property rules, the right to vote. Suffragists, like Millicent Fawcett,  used diplomacy and law-abiding methods to … Continue reading Using Postcards for History: Suffragettes

The National Wallace Monument, Stirling

The National Wallace Monument at Abbey Craig, Stirling, Scotland, holds a commanding place within sight of Stirling Bridge, where, in 1297, William Wallace’s army defeated King Edward I’s English invaders. It sits majestically high up on a hill, visible from the motorway below, and peers out from above the trees. It was designed by architect J T Rochead, whose design came first in a national … Continue reading The National Wallace Monument, Stirling

The Churchyard of Dunblane Cathedral

I recently visited the churchyard of Dunblane Cathedral. Although a Sunday afternoon, I wasn’t compelled to explore inside and concentrated on walking around the outside of the building and thought I’d share a few photos of my all-too-brief visit. The church dates back to the twelveth century and is overseen by Historic Scotland. It is the parish church of Dunblane and is of the Church of Scotland … Continue reading The Churchyard of Dunblane Cathedral

Walton Prison’s First Execution: Elizabeth Berry, Serial Poisoner?

Originally posted on HistorianRuby: An Historian's Miscellany:
Thirty-two years after being built, Walton Prison in Liverpool witnessed its first execution. On 14 March 1887, Elizabeth Berry suffered the ignominy of being the first prisoner and one of only two women to be executed there. The execution chamber was hastily built. It appears that a reprieve for the prisoner was expected and when this was… Continue reading Walton Prison’s First Execution: Elizabeth Berry, Serial Poisoner?

The Kirkyard of St Nicholas, Aberdeen

I recently visited Aberdeen, and one of the places that drew me in was the Kirkyard of St Nicholas. I have a slightly odd fascination with cemeteries and love reading the sometimes fascinating inscriptions on gravestones. St Nicholas is the patron saint of Aberdeen, on the north-east coast of Scotland. The site has been used for burials for at least 900 years and was particularly … Continue reading The Kirkyard of St Nicholas, Aberdeen

Suffrage Stories: Save Mrs Pankhurst’s Statue

Originally posted on Woman and her Sphere:
A planning application has been made to Westminster Council to dismantle this statue of Mrs Pankhurst – which stands as close as possible to the Houses of Parliament. The plan is to banish this statue to the grounds of Regent’s University, a private university, in Regent’s Park. See the planning application here. The group behind the application calls… Continue reading Suffrage Stories: Save Mrs Pankhurst’s Statue

In the News: Elizabethan Ring Found and Henry VIII Portrait Dated Using Dendrochronology

A Lost Elizabethan* Ring  An English metal detectorist literally struck gold when searching a Somerset field.  Last year he found a gold ring that has been dated to between 1550 and 1650. After being registered as treasure, it was examined by the British Museum and has since been offered for sale. However, with no museums wishing to purchase it, it will be auctioned next month. … Continue reading In the News: Elizabethan Ring Found and Henry VIII Portrait Dated Using Dendrochronology

Titanic Survivor Lawrence Beesley: the Day of the Disaster

Lawrence Beesley was a second-class passenger on the ill-fated Titanic, the White Star Line Liner that sank on its maiden voyage on 15 April 1912. A Cambridge-educated teacher, he had recently resigned his post as science master at Dulwich College, London. He was travelling to America for an extended holiday and had aimed to visit his brother who was residing in Canada. Within weeks of … Continue reading Titanic Survivor Lawrence Beesley: the Day of the Disaster

@HistorianRuby: Social Media Links

We all know that social media is increasingly important in many peoples lives. We check our stats, notifications, likes, follows and friend requests etc. and it’s no different for amateur and professional bloggers: we use social media to publicise our work. For public historians, it is crucial that they promote their latest TV programs, books and magazine articles using modern social media platforms to engage … Continue reading @HistorianRuby: Social Media Links

In the News: the Hot Summer Uncovers History

Hidden Archaeology Recently, the hot weather in Britain and Ireland has uncovered the remains of historic buildings hidden from view for hundreds of years. Marks on the parched grass delineate where buildings once sat and a race to plot each scorch mark then ensued before rain once again caused the finds to be hidden from view. Aerial investigators flew over Wales to record hitherto lost … Continue reading In the News: the Hot Summer Uncovers History

Gold Post Boxes: Commemorating Britain’s Sporting Heroes

British Olympic gold medal winners in 2012 got more than the gold medals that defined them as elite sportsmen and women. The gold medal winners for London 2012 were also commemorated with gold painted post boxes in their hometowns and a set of stamps. I bought two sets of stamps as mementoes of the historic games: those of Sir Andy Murray, who won his gold … Continue reading Gold Post Boxes: Commemorating Britain’s Sporting Heroes

This Week’s Second-hand Book Buys

There’s something about antique and second-hand bookshops that really appeal to me. I love the haphazard lines, the irregularity and the chance of finding a real gem of a book! I have filled what amounts to several bookshelves worth of books with acquisitions from such stores. Yesterday, on my travels, I came across a second-hand bookshop in Keswick and began exploring their history section. In … Continue reading This Week’s Second-hand Book Buys