To Find the ‘Write’ Word: Revisited

This post was written after my blogging hiatus. I had the idea for a week or two and then struggled to get the words onto [virtual] paper. However, I persevered and finally completed a finished article that wasn’t a re-blog or a sharing of an academic piece. HistorianRuby was back in business! I’ve had some more fun with words over recent weeks – I heard … Continue reading To Find the ‘Write’ Word: Revisited

Alan Turing: WWII Code-breaker

Alan Turing Lived Here! A few minutes walk from the River Thames at Hampton, is a house adorned with a plaque celebrating that Alan Turing lived there from 1945 – 1947, when he worked at the nearby National Physical Laboratory. But who was Alan Turing? Alan Turing was born June 1912. He studied mathematics at Cambridge University and graduated in 1934 with a first class … Continue reading Alan Turing: WWII Code-breaker

‘What’s Featured?’ on HistorianRuby: a New Series

On the first of each month, or as near as, work and family commitments permitting, I will feature several of my posts thematically. I will also write a new themed post to coincide with the current chosen topic. For this I will be utilising the ‘featured content’ option on my WordPress theme – I use Canard. I’ve tried to find a new theme, (I get … Continue reading ‘What’s Featured?’ on HistorianRuby: a New Series

28 June 1491: the Birth of Henry VIII

Henry VIII was born on 28 June 1491 at Greenwich Palace, he was the second son of Henry VII and Elizabeth of York. When his elder brother Arthur died in 1502 he became heir to the English throne. Arthur had recently married Spanish princess Katherine of Aragon. After Arthur’s death, Henry became betrothed to his brother’s widow, maintaining the Spanish alliance with Ferdinand and Isabella, … Continue reading 28 June 1491: the Birth of Henry VIII

Guest Blog: a Wartime Romance, Jumping Feet First into Love

I’m thrilled to welcome author Geoff Le Pard for a guest post on HistorianRuby! Geoff has written a captivating memoir, Apprenticed to my Mother, which focuses on his relationship with his mother after his father’s death. Within this remit, however, he frequently reminisces about both his parents. His father Desmond, illustrated through many of his poems in the volume, was frustrated by his failure to … Continue reading Guest Blog: a Wartime Romance, Jumping Feet First into Love

22 June 1948: Empire Windrush Arrived in Britain

In 1948, Britain needed a fresh influx of people to help rebuild the country after World War Two had battered Britain’s towns and cities. The arrival of British citizens from the Caribbean on 22 June 1948, at Tilbury Docks, Essex, on the Empire Windrush, was a defining moment in Britain’s post-war history. It signalled a welcoming of citizens of the British Empire to embark on … Continue reading 22 June 1948: Empire Windrush Arrived in Britain

Pocahontas: the Native American Princess Buried in Gravesend, Kent

Pocahontas was born circa 1596, near Jamestown, Virginia, U.S.A. and died in March 1617 in Gravesend, Kent, England. Her story has fascinated for 400 years, but how many people know that she is buried in the Garden of England, as Kent is known? Pocahontas was buried in the chancel of the church of St George in 1617, the church was destroyed by fire in 1727 … Continue reading Pocahontas: the Native American Princess Buried in Gravesend, Kent

Jack the Ripper: the Whitechapel Murderer

In the early hours of 31 August 1888, a killer came out of the shadows in the narrow streets of Whitechapel, London, and claimed the first of his five victims. On the 9 November 1888, after slaughtering his final victim he evaporated seemingly into thin air. Who was the notorious Jack the Ripper? With a list of suspects that seems to grow at least one … Continue reading Jack the Ripper: the Whitechapel Murderer

Guest Blog: a Post-War Childhood in Liverpool

A guest post from George Boyland. George is a regular contributor to The Guardian’s Readers’ Recommend music blog. During World War Two, frightened Luftwaffe pilots, seeing the flak over Manchester and Liverpool, would turn back and drop their bombs over the last city before the North Sea – Hull. That city had it bad. But, apart from the East End of London, nowhere had it … Continue reading Guest Blog: a Post-War Childhood in Liverpool

Hampton Court Palace: Cumberland Art Gallery

Hampton Court Palace is famous for being the former home of Henry VIII – it also houses the wonderful Cumberland Art Gallery that displays treasures from the Royal Collection. The gallery occupies the four remaining rooms of William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland, the younger son of George II. Take a look at some of my favourite works of art housed therein, including a painting of … Continue reading Hampton Court Palace: Cumberland Art Gallery

Hampton Court Palace: a Glimpse of Tudor and Georgian Tapestries

For centuries tapestries were used as a decorative status symbol at royal courts. They were emblematic of the power and grandeur of the royal house and offered a luxury that few could afford. Tapestries were a sumptuous demonstration of status and their exorbitant price reflected the skill and materials needed, such as gilt and silk, to make such works of art. Easily transportable they would … Continue reading Hampton Court Palace: a Glimpse of Tudor and Georgian Tapestries

4 June 1738: the Birth of George III

A fellow blogger kindly reminded me that George III’s birthday fell on 4 June. He was born in 1738 at Norfolk House, 31 St James’ Square, Westminster, London, which was built in 1722 for the 8th Duke of Norfolk. You can read my earlier post Thoughts on George III, here. It’s a brief overview of all things George III. It was the first post in … Continue reading 4 June 1738: the Birth of George III

Tracing my Boyland and Gray Ancestors

I started this blog to share fascinating stories from history. Not least of those, are my family history posts. I have researched my family’s history on and off for three decades, with more off than on, and usually with an intense burst of activity after travelling to a specific archive or record office.  This blog is now two-years-old and this is its 94th article! So I … Continue reading Tracing my Boyland and Gray Ancestors

HistorianRuby is Two-Years-Old!

Saturday 2 June is my 2 year blogging anniversary! HistorianRuby has now published 93 articles! Have I favourites? Yes. You can’t help feeling more for the posts that you have put your heart and soul into for a period of research and I have many where I’ve immersed myself into the study of the topic and this passion is somehow conveyed in the writing. When … Continue reading HistorianRuby is Two-Years-Old!