Hampton Court Palace: a Glimpse of Tudor and Georgian Tapestries

For centuries tapestries were used as a decorative status symbol at royal courts. They were emblematic of the power and grandeur of the royal house and offered a luxury that few could afford.

Tapestries were a sumptuous demonstration of status and their exorbitant price reflected the skill and materials needed, such as gilt and silk, to make such works of art.

Easily transportable they would be rolled up and taken on procession with the monarch.

Rather than commission new tapestries, William III used Tudor tapestries to decorate the  State Bedchamber highlighting the magnificence of those already in the royal estate.

I was told during my visit to Hampton Court Palace that Henry VIII had more than 2,000 in his possession and around fifty have survived. All are owned by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II.

Tapestry, The Great Hall, Hampton Court Palace
Tapestry at the Great Watching Chamber, Hampton Court Palace
The Great Watching Chamber, Hampton Court Palace
The Triumphs of Petrarch (1500 -23), Great Watching Chamber, Hampton Court Palace
Tapestry, Georgian Apartments, Hampton Court Palace
Tapestry, Georgian Apartments, Hampton Court Palace
State Bedchamber, Hampton Court Palace
State Bedchamber, Hampton Court Palace

 

Images author’s own

Sources:

Hampton Court Palace

https://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/themes/trails/tapestries-in-the-royal-collection

 

3 thoughts on “Hampton Court Palace: a Glimpse of Tudor and Georgian Tapestries

  1. the detail that went into these tapestries was amazing, I would love to know how long each of them took and how many worked on each individual one. Lovely piece again about one of my favourite places

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks 🙂
      They would take several months, I believe. The warder in the Watching Chamber told me that the tapestry guilds would not allow women, it was only men who were permitted to make tapestries. This didn’t change until late in the nineteenth century (according to him).

      Like

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